Phoenicians- Lebanon’s Epic Heritage

Just released December 2005

Click here to order

Click here to print out a flyer to post or share at your events.

The author, Mr. Sanford Holst has spent 30 years of research working on this book. A donation will be made to charities in Lebanon for every copy sold. Below is the introduction by the author, table of contents and other information about the book. Order your copy and a copy for a friend. This will make a perfect gift for the holidays or for any occasion. The book is excellent and is a must read

The Phoenicians rose to fame on the shores of Lebanon, and became the masters of sea trade around the ancient Mediterranean. They accumulated wealth and knowledge at a fabulous rate, but hid it all from view. Publicly adventurous, highly skilled and diplomatic, they were privately lovers of inspiring art, luxurious homes, and the beauty of nature.

This saga is not just about battles, monuments and papyrus scrolls. It is about flesh and blood people who emerged from the cedars of Lebanon in 6000 BC, experienced the desperation of numerous defeats and the euphoria of many triumphs, and whose descendants still live today. Now, for the first time, read the full story of these remarkable people and the rise of Lebanon.

Continue reading

The Cedars of Lebanon


The Cedar of Lebanon, Cedrus Libani, is an evergreen of the family Pinaceae. This coniferous plant was first found in Lebanon, on the Mount Lebanon range at Sannine, Barouk, and the eastern and western mountain chains. The tree however is not only found in Lebanon, but forests of Cedrus Libani grow in Cilicia, the Taurus Mountains, Cyprus and Morocco, although many of these are considered to be different races of the same species. The Mount Lebanon chain used to be almost completely covered with cedars. In addition, many handsome specimens are cultivated in several countries of the world, notably in England and in France.Cedrus Libani possesses an imposing trunk that may attain a height of 120 feet and a diameter of 9 feet. Such a trunk is often branching and having a dense crown with an inclined dark green head of characteristic flat growth in adult trees. Secondary branchlets are often ramified like a candelabra. Warberton, in his “Crescent and Cross”, described a Cedar of Lebanon with a trunk of 45 feet in circumference. Burckhardt speaks of twelve very ancient trees called the “Saints”. These had four, five, and even seven gigantic trunks” springing from the same base”, bearing, like American Sequoitas, leaves only at their very tops. The bark of the Cedar of Lebanon is dark gray and exudes a gum of balsam, which makes the wound so fragrant that to walk in a grove of cedars is an utmost delight. The wood is astonishingly decay resistant and it is never eaten by insect larvae. It is of a beautiful red tone, solid, and free from knots.

The terminal shoots are erect or slightly inclined. The tree blossoms in September or October, which is peculiar to the genus Cedrus among the conifers. It bears cones that require three years to mature. The cone is initially tiny and pale green. The second year it reaches its full size that ranges between 3-4.5 inches in height and has a characteristic violet purple color. In the third season it turns into a rich brown and scatters its seeds, which are minute, considering the size of the tree. The cones are born upright on the upper side of the branches.
Continue reading