Making Phoenician history accessible to all

Susan Velasquez
Newark City Guide Examiner

Salim George Khalaf, founder and author of the Encyclopedia Phoeniciana, has been sharing his knowledge and information on Phoenician history since 1996. Discovering an obvious lack of accurate historical information about his culture and background, he decided to put his own website together, and it is now considered one of the best resources for students and artists. He is now working with Dr. Nicholas Kahwaji at the newly formed Phoenician International Research Center.

According to their website: The center is a not-for-profit organization, which researches the history and contribution to world culture of the Canaanite Phoenicians and Punic people, from the dawn of history until present day. It supports ancient history student scholarships, disseminates information through phoenicia.org, builds international and domestic relations with similar centers, publishes books on the subject, creates electronic libraries and databases, and promotes the preservation and protection of Phoenician antiquities and historic sites.

The center is in touch with scholars in Italy to promote collaboration with Italian, Tunisian and Spanish centers and scholars that work in this field. Further, the center looks forward to signing collaborative agreements with Lebanese institutes, centers and universities that are interested in pursuing this subject.
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The Lebanese Language

Taken from the Lebanese Language Website www.lebaneselanguage.org

History

Introduction:

Lebanese is the native language of the people of Lebanon. In addition to daily conversations, Lebanese is used in an extensive body of popular poetry, play production, popular music, television shows, and much more. Due to the huge media production in Lebanese, the language became instrumental in understanding the rest of the languages and dialects spoken in Palestine, and parts of Syria and Jordan.

The Lebanese Language belongs to the West and Central Semitic family of languages that includes Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, and Arabic. Other forms of this spoken languages include the Palestinian dialects, the Coastal and Central Syrian Dialects and some dialects of Jordanian to a lesser extent. The Lebanese language is an amalgamation of various languages that passed over Lebanon. It is a result of centuries of cumulative linguistic assimilation, thus is the state of every living language today.
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