Five Important Phoenician Contributions to Western Civilization

phoenicians

 

Anthony Hopper, Yahoo! Contributor Network

Phoenician communities started appearing along the coastlines of modern day Syria, Israel, and Lebanon around 3000 B.C. Beginning with Byblos, many of these settlements gradually developed into urban trading centers. This period began in about 1500 B.C., though Byblos had attained city status before that time. Over the next few centuries, the Phoenicians developed into adept traders whose ships plied the whole of the Mediterranean and beyond.

They established colonies in North Africa, Spain, Italy, and other places along the Mediterranean coast. The Phoenician city-states’ power and influence waned in the latter half of the first millennium B.C., but not before they had made important, lasting contributions to Western civilization.

Here are five important Phoenician contributions to Western society.

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Phoenicians- Lebanon’s Epic Heritage

Just released December 2005

Click here to order

Click here to print out a flyer to post or share at your events.

The author, Mr. Sanford Holst has spent 30 years of research working on this book. A donation will be made to charities in Lebanon for every copy sold. Below is the introduction by the author, table of contents and other information about the book. Order your copy and a copy for a friend. This will make a perfect gift for the holidays or for any occasion. The book is excellent and is a must read

The Phoenicians rose to fame on the shores of Lebanon, and became the masters of sea trade around the ancient Mediterranean. They accumulated wealth and knowledge at a fabulous rate, but hid it all from view. Publicly adventurous, highly skilled and diplomatic, they were privately lovers of inspiring art, luxurious homes, and the beauty of nature.

This saga is not just about battles, monuments and papyrus scrolls. It is about flesh and blood people who emerged from the cedars of Lebanon in 6000 BC, experienced the desperation of numerous defeats and the euphoria of many triumphs, and whose descendants still live today. Now, for the first time, read the full story of these remarkable people and the rise of Lebanon.

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Free Lebanon and Eternity

By: Dr. Charles Malik

From Charles Malik’s book “ Lebanon In Itself “ Translated from Arabic by Dr. George Sabra and Revised by Kenneth Mortimer (The Murex Series By Notre Dame University, Louaize, Lebanon.)

When Lebanon labored in the United Nations to establish the dignity, rights and basic freedoms of the human being in the unique and magnificent formulation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the depths of Lebanese being spoke through the mouths of its representatives. The story of that labor has not yet been written; in its existential hidden aspects and secrets it will never be written.The Universal Declaration of Human Rights begins as follows: “Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world…”

And Article One states: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.”

The truth is that without that dignity and those rights, without that freedom and brotherhood, without that reason and conscience, Lebanon would not have been, and it would not have been able to live and endure in defiance of the ages and epochs.

That is what we have many times said, declared and recorded before the whole world, and what we have, finally, worked to incorporate in those texts. I assure you that the annual world celebration on December 10 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is a celebration of Lebanon Day. The whole world knows Lebanon’s contribution; it testifies to it on that day, but, alas, we have not yet put it at the forefront of our official national holidays!
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