Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet: Why is it so loved?

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By Shoku Amirani & Stephanie Hegarty BBC World Service

Kahlil Gibran is said to be one of the world’s bestselling poets, and his life has inspired a play touring the UK and the Middle East. But many critics have been lukewarm about his merits. Why, then, has his seminal work, The Prophet, struck such a chord with generations of readers?

Since it was published in 1923, The Prophet has never been out of print. The perennial classic has been translated into more than 50 languages and is a staple on international best-seller lists. It is thought to have sold tens of millions of copies.

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Five Important Phoenician Contributions to Western Civilization

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Anthony Hopper, Yahoo! Contributor Network

Phoenician communities started appearing along the coastlines of modern day Syria, Israel, and Lebanon around 3000 B.C. Beginning with Byblos, many of these settlements gradually developed into urban trading centers. This period began in about 1500 B.C., though Byblos had attained city status before that time. Over the next few centuries, the Phoenicians developed into adept traders whose ships plied the whole of the Mediterranean and beyond.

They established colonies in North Africa, Spain, Italy, and other places along the Mediterranean coast. The Phoenician city-states’ power and influence waned in the latter half of the first millennium B.C., but not before they had made important, lasting contributions to Western civilization.

Here are five important Phoenician contributions to Western society.

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Language, Memory, and Identity in the Middle East: The Case of Lebanon

http://www.youtube.com/p/D141E8114DC5A8FA?hl=sv_SE&fs=1

Dr. Franck Salameh, assistant professor of Near Eastern Studies at Boston College, talks about his book. The book proposes a new reading of modern Middle Eastern history and suggests alternate solutions to the region’s problems. The book is an attempt to rehabilitate and bring back to the fore of Middle East Studies the issue of language as a key factor in shaping (and misshaping) the region, with the hope of rediscovering a broader, more honest, and less ideologically tainted discussion on the Middle East. Language, Memory, and Identity in the Middle East has a special focus on Lebanon, because Lebanon has traditionally acted as the region’s template for change and a barometer gauging its problems and charting its progress.